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The Top 6 JDM Cars Of All Time

In 1988, JDM cars were limited by voluntary self-restraints among manufacturers to 280 horsepower (PS) (276 hp) and a top speed of 180 km/h (111.8 mph), limits imposed by the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA) for safety. The horsepower limit was lifted in 2004 but the speed limit of 180 km/h (111.8 mph) remains in effect. Many JDM cars have speedometers that register up to 180 km/h (111.8 mph) (certain Nissans go up to 190 km/h, and the GT-R has a mechanism that removes the speed limiter on a track) but all have speed limiters.

1. Mazda RX7 (FD3S)


The original RX-7 FC was a sports car with pop-up headlamps. The compact and lightweight Wankel rotary engine is situated slightly behind the front axle, a configuration marketed by Mazda as “front mid-engine”. It was offered as a two-seat coupé, with optional “occasional” rear seats in Japan, Australia, the United States, and other parts of the world. The rear seats were initially marketed as a dealer-installed option for the North American markets.

2. Subaru Impreza WRX STi (GC8)

The Subaru Impreza (スバル・インプレッサ?) is a compact family car that has been manufactured since 1992 by Subaru, introduced as a replacement for the Leone, with the predecessor’s EA series engines replaced by the new EJ series.

Now in its fifth generation, Subaru has offered four-door sedan and five-door body variants since 1992; the firm also offered a coupe from 1995 until 2000, and a wagon from the Impreza’s introduction until 2007, when a five-door hatchback replaced it. Mainstream versions have received naturally aspirated “boxer” flat-four engines ranging from 1.5- to 2.5-liters, with the performance-oriented Impreza WRX and WRX STI models uprated with the addition of turbochargers. Since the third generation series, some markets have adopted the abbreviated Subaru WRX name for these high-performance variants. The first three generations of Impreza in North America were also available with an off-road appearance package called the Outback Sport. For the fourth generation, this appearance package was renamed the XV (Crosstrek in North America), and, unlike the Outback Sport (which was exclusive to the North American market), is sold internationally.

The Impreza (also Impreza WRX and Impreza WRX STI) is a major rival to the Mitsubishi Lancer (and Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution).

3.Nissan Silvia S13

The Nissan Silvia is the name given to the company’s long-running line of sport coupes based on the Nissan S platform. Although recent models have shared this chassis with other vehicles produced by Nissan (most notably the European 200SX and North American 240SX in the S13 and S14 generations, and 180SX in the Japanese market), the name Silvia is not interchangeable with the chassis codes. Nissan Silvia’s main competitors worldwide are Honda Prelude, Mazda MX-6, Toyota Celica and Mitsubishi Eclipse, and in North America, the 240SX also competed against Acura Integra.

4.Toyota AE86

The AE86 generation of the Toyota Corolla Levin and Toyota Sprinter Trueno is a small, lightweight coupe or hatchback introduced by Toyota in 1983 as part of the fifth generation Toyota Corolla lineup.The AE86 generation was also known as ‘Hachiroku’,which means 86 in Japanese.(八十六) For the purpose of brevity, the insider-chassis code of “AE86” depicts the 1600 cc RWD model from the range. In classic Toyota code, the “A” represents the engine that came in the car (4A series), “E” represents the Corolla, “8” represents the fifth generation (E80 series) and “6” represents the variation within this generation.

5. Mitsubishi Lancer Evo VI

The Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution, also known as the Lancer Evo or just Evo, was a sports sedan manufactured by Mitsubishi Motors that is based on the normal Lancer. There have been ten official versions to date, and the designation of each model is most commonly a Roman numeral. All use two litre, turbocharged engines and all-wheel drive systems.

The Evolution was originally intended only for Japanese markets, but demand on the “grey import” market led the Evolution series to be offered through Ralliart dealer networks in the United Kingdom and in various European markets from around 1998. Mitsubishi decided to export the eighth generation Evolution to the United States in 2003 after witnessing the success Subaru had in that market with their long-time direct rival, the Subaru Impreza WRX STi.

6. Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R

The Nissan Skyline GT-R is a Japanese sports car based on the Nissan Skyline range.

The first cars named “Skyline GT-R” were produced between 1969 and 1972 under the model code KPGC10, and enjoyed legendary success in local Japanese touring car racing. This model was followed by a brief production run of second-generation cars, under model code KPGC110, in 1973. After a 16-year hiatus, the GT-R name was revived in 1989 as the BNRR32 (“R32”) Skyline GT-R. This model GT-R proceeded to win the Japanese JTCC Group A series championship four years in a row. The R32 GT-R also had success in the Australian Touring Car Championship helping the R31 Skyline GTS-R to victory in 1990 and winning alone in 1991 and 1992, until a regulation change excluded the GT-R in 1993.

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